6 Best VPNs for Brazil

Brazil is the largest and most populous country on the continent of South America and in the Latin America region. Following its tribal beginnings, the country remained a Portuguese colony from 1500 to 1822 after which it gained its independence as the Empire of Brazil, later becoming a democracy in 1986. Since then, the country’s economy has grown hugely and following the birth of the Internet, penetration rates have reached 53% of its 200 million population, which is relatively low when compared with North America and Western Europe but still that means more than 100 million people online today.

This guide gives a brief overview of the state of privacy in Brazil, including details on data retention legislation, internet censorship and the growth of VPNs. We’ll also recommend six of the top VPN providers for use in Brazil.

Summary

Provider Features Price Links
1 Hide My Ass!
  • Large network
  • 256-bit keys
  • Custom apps
  • Live chat
  • Free proxy
$11.52
/month
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2 PureVPN
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Smart DNS
  • Live chat
$9.95
/month
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3 IPVanish
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
$10
/month
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4 VPNArea
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Live chat
$9.90
/month
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5 ExpressVPN
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Zero logs
  • Live chat
$8.32
/month
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6 Private Internet Access
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Live chat
$6.95
/month
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Quick links


Data retention

Currently, Brazil does not operate mandatory data retention. The government’s first serious attempt to adopt the ‘Azeredo Bill’ in 2005 met with strong protests from NGOs and activists.

The bill, which was backed by corporate entities as well as government, proposed among other things a clamping down on data collection and online piracy. The largest of the protest campaigns, ‘Mega Não’ (Mega No), generated widespread public support against the bill.

In response to the campaign, the government proposed a civil framework called Marco Civil, which promised the protection of freedom of speech online as well as assurances for Internet Service Providers (ISPs).

In 2012, campaigners voiced concerns about amendments to the 2003 Draft Law, which, along with proposals to identify and punish crimes committed online, sought to discretely usher in provisions for mass surveillance and data retention.

Map of Brazil
Brazil has a long and impressive tradition of civil protest and human rights activism.

In 2015, the Brazilian Senate managed to approve new amendments to the bill, whereby ISPs would be obliged to retain registration and connection data for three years. The bill has still to be debated by the House of Representatives.

Online censorship

Largely speaking, Brazil has remained unscathed by online though there have been a few instances of restricted access.

In 2009, the Chamber President ordered TV Câmara, a public station, to remove an online video of a journalist criticizing Gilmar Mendes’ tenure as Court President. The video was later posted on YouTube and back onto TV Câmara’s website.

In another incident from 2012, a Brazilian court ordered the arrest of Google’s most senior executive in the country after the company refused to take down a YouTube video criticising a mayoral candidate.

WhatsApp
In 2015, mobile operators in Brazil claimed the messaging app undercuts their services.

In December 2015, WhatsApp messenger was blocked for 48-hours by a Brazilian court after mobile operators in the country complained about the service and other free-to-use messaging and VoIP apps like Viber, which they argued undercut their business.

VPN use

A 2014 survey by reputed market research firm GlobalWebIndex found that a staggering 37% of inhabitants in Brazil had used a VPN while online, a figure that looks set to grow in light of tightening data legislation around the world.

As well as encrypting all of your inbound and outbound traffic through a secure VPN tunnel, VPNs protect users from DDoS attacks, hacking, governmental and corporate surveillance and tracking, as well as unlocking geo-restricted content that may not be available to those in Brazil, particularly video-on-demand and streaming services such as those offered by Netflix, Hulu and UFC.

For those living outside of of the country, VPN servers can be accessed via Brazil, allowing you to keep up-to-date with Brazilian TV series and sports programmes, such as telenovelas and Copa do Brasil for example.

Best VPN providers

Below we’ve recommended six of the best VPN providers for use in Brazil.

As well as guaranteeing not to retain any of your web traffic, all services offer an array of secure encryption protocols, including OpenVPN and L2TP/IPsec, and run dedicated servers within Brazil.

Provider Features Price Links
1 Hide My Ass!
  • Large network
  • 256-bit keys
  • Custom apps
  • Live chat
  • Free proxy
$11.52
/month
Visit Provider
Read Review
2 PureVPN
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Smart DNS
  • Live chat
$9.95
/month
Visit Provider
Read Review
3 IPVanish
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Zero logs
$10
/month
Visit Provider
Read Review
4 VPNArea
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Zero logs
  • Live chat
$9.90
/month
Visit Provider
Read Review
5 ExpressVPN
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Zero logs
  • Live chat
$8.32
/month
Visit Provider
Read Review
6 Private Internet Access
  • Torrent-friendly
  • Custom apps
  • 256-bit keys
  • Zero logs
  • Live chat
$6.95
/month
Visit Provider
Read Review

HideMyAss!

hidemyass

HideMyAss! (HMA) is based in London, UK. Its parent company Privax was bought in 2015 by IT security giant AVG.

HMA offers OpenVPN TCP encryption as default, with OpenVPN UDP, PPTP and L2TP/IPSec protocols also available. Currently, there are two HMA servers in Brazil, one in São Paulo (128 IPs) and one in João Pessoa (127 IPs).

HMA does not collect traffic data though it does keep connections logs, which includes a time stamp, the amount of data transmitted, the IP address used to connect to the VPN server and the IP address of the VPN server itself. This data is stored for 2-3 months.

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PureVPN

PureVPN

PureVPN has its headquarters in Hong Kong, where there is no mandatory data retention. OpenVPN is the standard protocol with AES 256-CBC encryption. The following protocols are also available: L2TP/IPSec, IKEv2, SSTP and PPTP. PureVPN has six servers in São Paulo.

Traffic activity is not logged though basic connection logs are kept, which includes a time stamp and bandwidth usage (stored for one month).

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IPVanish

IPVanish

IPVanish is based in the United States, where it is not obliged to store user data. Encryption protocols include OpenVPN, L2TP/IPSec, IKEv2 and PPTP. Its OpenVPN protocol supports AES 128-bit and 256-bit ciphers. Currently, IPVanish has three servers in São Paulo.

IPVanish does not collect traffic or connection logs for its VPN service.

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VPNArea

VPNArea

VPNArea has its headquarters in Bulgaria, which allows the provider to operate with a zero-logs policy as it is not required by law to collect data.

Its servers and emails are hosted in Switzerland. Its VPN service uses up to 256-bit AES encryption and supports the following protocols: OpenVPN (UDP/TCP), L2TP and PPTP.

There are two servers in Paraiba to the north and two servers each in Brazil Franca and São Paulo to the south.

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ExpressVPN

ExpressVPN Brazil

ExpressVPN operates out of the British Virgin Islands, which is well-known for its lenient approach to data retention.

Encryption is 256-bit SSL-secured and subscribers can choose from the following protocols: OpenVPN (TCP, UDP), L2TP-IPsec, SSTP and PPTP. The provider runs two servers in São Paulo.

ExpressVPN does not collect user traffic data or connection logs.

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Private Internet Access

PIA VPN

Private Internet Access (PIA) is based in the USA, so it is not obliged to collect user data. PIA operates an impressive 20 servers in a single undisclosed location in Brazil. The following protocols are available using 128-bit or 256-bit encryption: OpenVPN, L2TP/IPsec and PPTP.

PIA’s privacy policy states that traffic data, DNS or meta data is not logged.

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Glancing back at the curve.

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